Arts and Crafts

Here is a photo I took at the Gamble house in LA, the pinnacle of Arts and Crafts architecture. The inside of the house was dark and one could only walk around with a tour, so I didn’t come away with any interesting pictures. On the grounds however, free to roam, I took this picture of some of patio fashioned out of clinker bricks.DSC08899

Advertisements

Sea to Sky

Traveling up British Columbia’s route 99 is known as the Sea to Sky highway as it takes you from the water’s edge to high up in the mountains. When going to Whistler we drove up in a snow storm so we didn’t get to sett any of the beauty. On the way back the skies were a little clearer.

Whistler_Panorama1.jpgWhistler_Panorama2.jpg

Improving My Dynamic Range

Reflecting on the year: This year is drawing to a close and as part of a retrospective look on the year I am finishing and publishing several blog posts that at one point I started and never completed.

While in Philadelphia I sent some time playing around with High Dynamic Range (HDR) photography. For me to create images containing a larger dynamic range than my camera is able to capture I took several exposures with different EV values, to capture highlights, mid-tones, and shadows in detail and then composited the images together to create on image with a larger dynamic range than I would normally be able to capture.

Untitled_HDR6-Recovered

Philadelphia Museum of Art at night with HDR

Untitled_HDR6-comparison

Left is the HDR composited image and on the right is a single exposure

Who Turned Out the Lights?

As mentioned in my previous post I had the opportunity to go down to Oregon to see the total solar eclipse. It was well worth the trip down and the traffic up as seeing the entirety of the eclipse was very different than the 93% in Seattle or the 99% in Portland. Though stock was scarce I managed to get a solar filter for my camera and setup with a tripod and a telephoto lens to capture this astronomical oddity.

DSC07579

Just after C1 first photo I was able to capture as I was formatting my camera card as first contact was made to make room for all the eclipse photos.

DSC07605

About half an hour latter the moon is nearing the half way point. Around this time it starts getting noticeably cooler.

DSC07669

Through the camera or eclipse glasses the sun is now a sliver behind the moon. Without the glasses the only noticeable change is that sun light seems dimmer. This is about as much of the eclipse would have been seen in Seattle.

DSC07712

The sun gets smaller and smaller. This is about the extent of the eclipse that would have been seen from Portland.

DSC07748

An interesting phenomenon know as Bailey’s Beads. The last rays of sunlight are sneaking through the mountains and valleys of the moon, making the appearance of a string of beads. 

DSC07759

Totality. Now the glasses and solar filters can come off as the sun is completely eclipsed by the moon for 1 minute and 44 seconds. In the sky there is a black circle surrounded by white rays which is the sun corona, only visible to the human eye during a total eclipse. Stars are visible and the entire horizon looks like a sunrise. 

DSC07787

As C3 passes the total eclipse ends I sneak a picture of the ‘Diamond Ring’ before putting the solar filter back on the camera. 

DSC07818

The sun is back to being a sliver, and the entire process reverses its self. Around this point we did notice some light Shadow bands snaking across the ground.